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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
in cocoa, florida, for harriette and harry moore, leaders of the civil rights movement in florida. harry moore established the first branch of the naacp in brow ward county, florida, and considered the first martyr of the 1950's era civil rights movement. sadly on christmas night in 1951, the moores were killed by a bomb planted beneath their home. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in strong support of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes mr. clay from missouri. mr. clay: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i, too, want to join with my colleague from arizona in consideration of h.r. 2338 to name the post office in cocoa, florida, after harry t. and harriette moore. in accordance with committee requirements, h.r. 2338 is co-sponsored by all members of the florida delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by unanimous consent. it honors the legacy of harry t. and harry moore who both fought tirelessly for civil righ
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
countries should aspire. it's kind of flattering. our civil rights advance, one that was hard fought, but one. so far this treaty has been signed by 154 countries including the u.s. it's been ratified by 126 nations, not including the u.s. president obama, in other words, signed it a couple years ago, but it's not been ratified by the united states senate. to be clear, this treaty would not require anything from us at all. we already have disability rights. it just pushes other countries to do what we have done. we would commit on an international level to what we already believe in here. ratifying that treaty would help us lead the rest of the world to catch up to that historic leap that we took as a country when president bush signed that legislation. with the exception of a black helicopter conspiracy theory on the right championed by failed senator rick santorum, he, who i should mention is a columnist at a birther website, that's his job now, except for his nutso theories ratifying this treaty was a political no brainer. it has bipartisan support. this has the real thing. real b
that the civil rights of americans all 300 million of us should be taken away and we should be denied the right to own a gun that would be the only way to take it away from jovan belcher is to say no one can own a gun other than military or police. that's an outrageous suggestion. costas ought to be fired. >> larry it's ridiculous we're talking about firing a guy for trying to start a debate about how to control guns in this country. >> i don't want to talk about -- i want to leave the costas situation alone. he said what he said. what i want to talk about igor is the issue of violating the second amendment or greater gun regulation would have stopped this? i mean the question i have -- look, this guy was a big drinker. he suffered concussions. he use ad lot of pain killers. clearly, clearly he had huge mental and physical problems. how would the gun thing have played out if he couldn't have got end it? >> we don't know about this one case but we do know is in cases of domestic abuse you really do see this correlation that if there's a gun in the house the chances of death resulting from domest
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
passed the civil rights bill. said there was a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as representatives obey pointed out later on, that is manifested in what was brilliant on precedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing the invasion to kuwait and tried to pull together a unified respect you. it was an accidental. i really believe we work awfully hard in order to maintain. the keyword was the fact that tom foley and president bush have been members of congress to get there. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and raskin kautsky had been there. when the president was in the house there were personal relationships that we were in the nascent authority exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy on the process. we were commenting on dick darman. dick was from our perspective the heart and soul of the details of the process and barry and others have been talking about the budget enforcement act. wanamaker stays in the days in the white house and 89 as the new chief of staff came
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
and opportunities for all. equality before the law and civil rights. that is a psychic -- a society in which i want to live and my children to be able to live in of. there is no guarantee we will live happily ever after. the era of globalization -- we need to cooperate more than ever to defend our democracy. and our society. we cannot take what has been achieved for granted. we need to continue fighting for it on a daily basis. other parts of the world are developing. i mentioned at the beginning of my speech that in the g-20 and with its creation, it took the necessary consequence to involved in emerging regions of the world and the political system to rule the world but those parts of the world we consider today that the emerging countries are not sharing our values. the lowest salary, the lowest respect for individual rights, the los respect for freedom of speech, for example by closing the internet. it the lowest standard of what the are considering you in the united states in europe as our basic values and our standards representing our basic values. the best means to compete economically agai
the americans with disabilities act, which was extremely difficult to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this
are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2, we have gone from the dais where jerry cohen was the only lawyer -- the days where jerry cohen was the only lawyer in china to 17,000 law firms. as away from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors an
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
with more on her legal moves. >> that's right. staff sergeant jennifer hunt is suing the department of defense, as the civil affairs specialist in the army affairs. hunt has deployed to iraq and afghanistan, even earned a purple heart. hunt says the policy bang women from direct ground missions is illegal. the department of defense says more than 14,000 jobs previously closed. two women have opened up to them this year. denise? >> all right. thank you, kai. hunt says this lawsuit isn't calling for a certain number of combat positions to be open to women. but instead to give women an equal opportunity to compete for the jobs. >>> in wjz's healthwatch, a new study could change the standard of care in breast cancer treatment. new research suggests women should take tamoxifen for 10 years. twice as long as the current five-year recommendation. researchers at the university of oxford found breast cancer patients who took the drug longer, were less likely to die, and less likely to have their cancer come back. >>> well, a former student at frostbur
said it. we were both sort of shaking but you were right. that's the good news. we have dick blumenthal with us, he'll be talking about the republican purfidy how they stopped the treaty protecting civil liberty liberty. great show coming up. >> cenk: thanks. we're looking forward to it. when we come back, the elbow of the day. that's always fun. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: hunting deutsch was the job star in florida for governor rick scott. something we found out about him. he was taking unemployment before he got that job. now his job is to oversee people taking unemployment. from 2009 to may of 2011 he took unemployment. let me give you the specifics on that. he maxed out at $275 a week over 91 weeks. that's over $25,000 in government benefits. now if he really needed it, okay, fine. but it turns out he didn't. he had, for example home in santa rosa beach valued at $602,000. a condo in miami worth $500,000. he admits it. quote, at the end of the day i'm fortunate enough where i work for a very successful companies for a long period of time and luckily sold all my bank stocks and
for those caught near the front lines of the civil war, especially children. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is risking her life right now, one of the few western reporters on the ground inside northern syria. >> reporter: they are home again. but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about a third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back, only to find out that these streets are now on the front lines. if the regime can retake the neighborhood, it can cut off the main artery for opposition forces in aleppo and reopen a route to the airport. on a nearby hilltop, the neighborhood, the rebels used to control this one as well but lost it a month ago. the battle lines here are constantly fluid and snipers are a constant threat. the front line is visible just through here. and we can barely make out three bodies. the rebel fighters are telling us that they're two male and one female. there were five. they managed to extract two, but they can't reach the others. for the children here, gunfire has become background noise. this 12-year-old har
, this is a meeting for meeting's sake and the sake itself is a good one. this is about democracy. right? here's this -- i think we'll get a picture from the white house. here are the two of them having lunch together. this is about civility. this is about the civility of democracy and i think in and of itself that's plenty and i don't expect much more. >> well, at least we tried. at least we try. that's what they can say. listen. you were on the stage with these men face to face. you got to see them react when you moderated the second presidential debate. are there any points where these two could, could come together maybe, a meeting of the minds on anything or ideological differences too wide here? >> no. there's always some place that people can come together. but what do they both mention on election night? we both love america and want the best for america. so that's where the commonality here is in a democracy. and i didn't mean to suggest that it was -- i mean, i think that it's important for democracy to see this picture. but where can they meet? i mean, the president talking about do
reid's theory. right now, if you look at the voting history of the same there is a pro-gun majority in the senate. if subject to civil majority but would have a chance of passing to another thing that is very, very important is getting rid of senate majority leader harry reid and the future majority centers. their needs new point of order to get rid of this. reid's tactic about 60 times, far more than its predecessors all combined. it is something that would allow all members of the senate to actually participate in this deliberative process, to offer amendments. and if you were to pass this, it would be something that would be great to pass with 67 votes shutting down the debate. you might not have -- old problem of the let's call serial filibusters, it might actually go away if republicans were actually allowed to producer in the process. what we are seeing now is a construction of the minority's rights, the minority party's rights and individual's rights by trying to get rid of the motions to proceed, during the bills by enforcing the so-called talking filibusters. if you can try
promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest and the rights and liberties of individuals. is it should set and enforce standards. hear individual complaints against its members, and provide a fair, quick, and inexpensive arbitration service to deal with civil law claims. the chair and the other members of the body must be dependent and appointed by a fair and open process. it must comprise a majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that can be readily achieved by an appointments panel which could itself include a current editor, but with a substantial majority, demonstrably independent of the press, and of politicians. in the report, i explain who might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to think to establish a new press standards code or decide how an independent self-regulatory body would go about its business. as to a standards code, i recommend the development of an industry economy which could include serving editors. that comm
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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